The MOM 100 Blog

Monday Night Brisket

by Katie Workman  •  November 12, 2012 Serves 8 to 10

Brisket is interesting because two different groups can claim it as “their” dish; the Jews and the Texans. And I guess if you’re a Jewish Texan you get double helpings. Down South brisket is usually slow cooked over indirect heat, with basting and smoking often involved. The brisket here is from the Jewish camp, with the meat being braised in the oven for a long time. It’s a pot roast, essentially. Other cultures have their versions, too, and we could discuss them for a while, but this is not that kind of cookbook.

Many of us think of brisket during the Jewish holidays, and rarely otherwise, but like potato pancakes my family is so crazy about brisket that it makes no sense not to make it all throughout the colder months. First, it’s a pretty inexpensive cut of meat. Second, aside from acknowledging that it needs to cook for a few hours, it really takes little work. Don’t you just love a main course that you can ignore? Some recipes call for browning the brisket first, which is a nice step if you have extra time on your hands (pause for laughter). But it’s just not necessary for a nice tender brisket, and not only do you save the extra time, you also save having to clean up the splatters all over the stove (at least that’s what Gary tells me). The reason this is called Monday Night Brisket is because it’s the kind of dish you want to start early in the day, when you have a stretch of time, for example on a Sunday afternoon, and refrigerate overnight for the next night’s dinner.

First-cut brisket means brisket with much of the fat cut off (but not all, you don’t want that). If you get a bigger piece of meat and want to cut it into two pieces, you can overlap them in the pot. On the whole, brisket is fairly resilient.

Brisket is great served with roasted potatoes, mashed potatoes, or some simple buttered noodles.

1 teaspoon olive oil

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 teaspoon kosher or coarse salt

1⁄4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 first-cut beef brisket (4 to 5 pounds)

2 cups chopped onions

4 large carrots, peeled and thickly sliced

3 bay leaves

3 tablespoons tomato paste (optional; see the Cooking Tip)

1 cup low-sodium beef or chicken broth

1 can (28 ounces) crushed tomatoes in juice or puréed

1 cup red wine (any kind is fine), or an additional cup crushed tomatoes or broth

2 tablespoons finely chopped Italian (flat-leaf) parsley (optional), for garnish

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F.
  2. Place the olive oil, garlic, thyme, salt, and pepper in a small bowl and stir to mix. Rub the mixture all over.
  3. Place the brisket, fat side up, in a large casserole or Dutch oven with a tight-fitting lid. Toss in the onions, carrots, and bay leaves. If you are using the tomato paste, blend it into the broth then pour over the meat and vegetables. Then pour the crushed tomatoes and red wine, if using, on top. The liquid should cover the meat and most of the vegetables. Cover the casserole and bake the brisket until the meat is very tender, 3 to 31⁄2 hours.
  4.  If you are serving the brisket the next day, let it cool then put the entire casserole in the refrigerator. About an hour before serving, skim off any hardened fat, then take out the meat and cut off any excess fat from the top of the meat. Slice the brisket across the grain, as thin or thick as you like, then neatly return the sliced meat to the cooking liquid. Reheat the brisket on the stovetop over medium-low heat, or in a preheated 325°F oven, until everything is warmed through and the cooking liquid has reduced and thickened up a bit, about 30 minutes in the oven, maybe less on the stovetop. Adjust seasonings as needed.
  5. If you are serving the brisket right away, remove the meat from the casserole and let it rest on a platter, loosely tented with aluminum foil. Let the cooking liquid and vegetables sit for about 15 minutes, then spoon off any fat that has accumulated. Place the casserole over medium-high heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the liquid reduces a bit, about 10 minutes. Adjust seasonings as necessary. Slice the meat neatly across the grain, return it to the pot, and remove and discard the bay leaves
  6. You can serve the brisket in the casserole or transfer it to a large shallow bowl. Remove and discard the bay leaves and sprinkle the parsley on top of the brisket, if desired.

 

 

 

 

 

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Make Ahead

There are a few reasons to make the brisket a day or two ahead of time. (1) It tastes better; the flavors really meld and blend and all of that stuff, and the meat is at its most tender. (2) Your life will be easier the next day because dinner is basically made. (3) You can skim off the fat from the cooking liquid, which will create a more concentrated cooking liquid with no greasiness. (4) It’s much easier to slice the brisket when it’s cold.

What the Kids Can Do

The kids can peel carrots, if they can handle the peeler. They can also measure ingredients and add them to the pot with the brisket.

Cooking Tip

You’ll see that the brisket recipe calls for three liquids: broth, tomatoes, and wine. If you use only one or two of these, and just make the quantity equal to about 6 cups of liquid, the results will be fine. The tomato paste adds richness to the cooking liquid and is great, but if you don’t have any, add some squirts of ketchup or skip it altogether. The reason brisket tastes so good is mostly because of its long slow cooking in liquid, and it’s fairly magnanimous about what kind of liquid it is braised in.

THERE ARE 9 COMMENTS ON THIS POST:

  1. Apr 28, 2014
    @ 17:39 PM
    Lori Greer says ....

    I LOVE your cookbook! I’ve given 7 away as gifts!! I am so excited to be trying to make brisket for the first time this week. I’m from the south so the only brisket I’ve had is at BBQ joins where it’s served with coleslaw, baked beans, and potato salad. What sides would be appropriate with this dish?

    Reply

    • Apr 29, 2014
      @ 19:25 PM
      Katie Workman says ....

      that is so great to hear! It’s really anything you would think of with a pot roast or anther roast….roasted vegetables, andy kind of starch (mashed potatoes or roasted potatoes especially good), maybe steamed or roasted asparagus. Sauteed or roasted carrots or butternut squash. You’ll want to add color to the place, with the brown meat and the pale starch. And I always make salad with everything. let me know how it goes!

      Reply

  2. Mar 11, 2014
    @ 22:57 PM
    Teresa says ....

    Hello, I found this recipe in your cookbook, and I was curious if you think the brisket could be cooked in a slow cooker, as opposed to in the oven?

    Reply

    • Apr 2, 2014
      @ 14:33 PM
      Katie Workman says ....

      I’m quite sure that would work perfectly well!

      Reply

  3. Dec 5, 2012
    @ 22:16 PM
    greg says ....

    do you worry about the fat in this ?

    Reply

    • Dec 30, 2012
      @ 16:56 PM
      Katie Workman says ....

      that’s why I like to make it ahead; it’s easier to remove the fat once it rises to the top and hardens in the fridge.

      Reply

  4. Nov 16, 2012
    @ 07:32 AM
    Sally says ....

    I love brisket and will have to try your recipe. After reading your book, I also want to try the Beef Barley Soup, in addition to my other favorites with leftover brisket.

    Reply

    • Dec 28, 2012
      @ 10:37 AM
      Sally says ....

      Loved the brisket and loved the beef barley soup. Both are definitely going in my rotation of meals.

      Reply

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